social

I’m an Ophthalmologist. What Types of Content Should I Post Online?

I’m an Ophthalmologist. What Types of Content Should I Post Online?
“I’m an ophthalmologist, but I’m a little lost on how to use the Internet to the advantage of my practice. What types of content should I post online to get the most out of the investment I’ve made in my website and social media?”

If you’ve ever asked yourself (or anyone else) this question, rest assured that you’re not alone. We get it all the time – and it’s not just from ophthalmologists. We’ve heard it from optometrists, biotech engineers, family practice physicians, and many others.

So if you’re a little lost when it comes to what you should post on your website, blog, or social media channels, here are some ideas for starters:

The Smartest Ophthalmologists Use Social Media this Way

The Smartest Ophthalmologists Use Social Media this Way

When it comes to social media, many ophthalmologists are at a loss. How can I use social media to benefit my practice? What if I have nothing to say? How do I get followers? What will I post?

In response to these questions and the overall desire to run the best social media channels we can, we took a list at the top ophthalmologists and physicians who utilize social media to benefit their practices and grow their brands, and there were a few common trends. Here's what we found:

The Biggest Lie about Social Media

The Biggest Lie about Social Media

Let’s face it: social media has much of the ophthalmology world confused.

At first glance it might seem like an embarrassing thing to admit, but it’s really not. So many ophthalmologists have personal profiles on popular social media sites like Facebook and Twitter, but they still haven't yet found a way to integrate these channels into their practice and clinical work.

So what’s the biggest lie about social media?

How to use Twitter like the most successful physicians

How to use Twitter like the most successful physicians

There are a number of philosophies on how to successfully use Twitter as a business or networking tool, varying from carefully curating content to re-tweeting and following absolutely everybody. Some people focus on following those in a specific industry, others will literally follow tens (or hundreds) of thousands of people. Each of these philosophies have their merits (and downfalls), but when it comes to medical professionals using the social network, a few key items are in play.